Frequently Asked Questions

What insurances do you accept?

  • AARP Medicare Complete
  • Aetna
  • Amerigroup - Medicare
  • Auto Injury
  • Avalon
  • Beech Street
  • Blue Cross/Blue Shield (including myblue and blue select)
  • BWC Ohio
  • CCN
  • Celtic
  • ChampUS
  • ChampVA
  • Cigna
  • Coresource
  • Corvel
  • Coventry
  • Dept. of Labor - Kentucky
  • Department of Labor Workcomp
  • Depart of Transportation(DOT) certified
  • EBMS
  • Energy Employee
  • Evercare
  • Federal Workmans Compensation
  • First Health
  • FMH
  • Gallagher Basset
  • GHI
  • Golden Rule
  • Great West
  • Group Resource
  • Guardian
  • GWC-Cigna
  • Hanover
  • Harrington Benefit
  • Health Plan Mgmt .
  • Horace Mann Ins.
  • HRM Mngmt. Inc.
  • IAC
  • Intergrated Ins.
  • L and I (Washington state workmans compensation)
  • Loomis Benefit
  • Mail Handlers
  • Marsh Advantage
  • Mega Life & Health Ins.
  • Meritain Health
  • Mondial Assistance
  • Multi Plan
  • Nalc Heal Thplan
  • NEIHBP
  • NTL Elevator Health Pl.
  • NY State Ins. Fund
  • OCEBA
  • OH WC Injury
  • Palmetto GBA
  • PHCS
  • Preferred Care
  • Principal Life Ins.
  • QHP
  • Railroad Medicare
  • Secure Horizon
  • Sedgewick
  • Self Insr. Dept.
  • Sheet Metal Workers
  • Simply
  • SRS
  • Starbridge
  • State Comp Fund
  • State Ins. Fund
  • Staywell
  • Strategic Resource Grp
  • Tricare Standard
  • Unicare
  • Unisource Admin.
  • United Benefit Solut.
  • United Healthcare
  • Unitrin
  • Universal
  • Victims Compensation
  • WC Florida
  • WC Injury
  • WellCare
  • World Access
  • WTC

Why choose a D.O. over a M.D?

DO's and MD's are alike in many ways:

  • Applicants to both DO. and M.D. colleges typically have a four-year undergraduate degree with an emphasis on science courses.
  • Both DO's and MD's complete four years of basic medical education.
  • After medical school, both DO's and MD's can choose to practice in a specialty area of medicine such as psychiatry, surgery, or obstetrics. They both complete a residency program, which takes typically two to six years of additional training.
  • Both DO's and MD's must pass comparable state licensing examinations.
  • DO's and MD's both practice in fully accredited and licensed hospitals and medical centers.
  • DO's comprise a separate, yet equal branch of American medical care. Together DO's and MD's enhance the state of health care available in America.

DO's bring something extra to medicine:

  • Osteopathic schools emphasize training students to be primary care physicians.
  • DO's practice a "whole person" approach to medicine. Instead of just treating specific symptoms or illnesses, they regard your body as a complete entity who Osteopathic physicians focus on preventive healthcare.
  • DO's receive extra training in the musculoskeletal system - your body's interconnected system of nerves, muscles and bones that make up two-thirds of its body mass. This training provides osteopathic physicians with a better understanding of the ways that an injury or illness in one part of your body can affect another. It gives DO's a therapeutic and diagnostic advantage over those who do not receive additional specialized training.
  • Osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) is incorporated in the training and practice of osteopathic physicians. OMT allows physicians to use their hands to diagnose injury and illness and to encourage your body's natural tendency toward good health. By combining all other medical procedures with OMT, DO's offer their patients the most comprehensive care available in medicine today.